TV: Talk tech in the customer’s own language

Allow a customer to view a TV at its best and get hands on with the remote to see how it will perform when they get it home, recommends the team at T21

Do you know anyone who seriously claims to be unable to tell the difference between standard and high definition TV images – and is there any point explaining to them why 4K is so much better? Do you know anyone who doesn’t really care what a colour gamut is?

What about Quantum dots? Know anyone whose eyes glaze over as soon as you start explaining the differences between QLED and OLED? Ever found yourself wrangling over which display technology is best with someone who’s read far too much stuff about it on the internet?

If the answer is a resounding yes to any of these then we sympathise.

At T21 we love our technology and find it surprising when normal people don’t. How can anyone not be excited when stood face-to-face with a 65-inch near-bezel-less behemoth running HDR video in 4K with over 90% P3?

Crazy, right?

But that’s the way of the world, we guess.

So, to help avoid that awkward situation of customers backing away from you as soon as you reach under the counter for your calibration software, we’ve put together five of our favourite top TV sales tips for your reading pleasure.

Here goes:

  1. Talk tech in the customer’s own language. If they’re really not into it then there’s no point using complicated terms to explain how a TV works. However, if they are into their tech then go for it. Just remember not to be confrontational if the customer actually does know more about it than you do.
  2. Don’t tell your customer that the picture is amazing. Let them say it themselves. If they don’t think it’s amazing at all, don’t argue. Ask them why not, what are they expecting? Once you have the answers to that, then recommend a TV more likely to deliver the wow-factor they’re looking for.
  3. Have multiple sources connected to your TVs. If you can easily switch between the manufacturer’s fabulously-rendered showreel of sweeping Mediterranean vistas and close-ups of fruit and carpentry, to something more mainstream from Sky, Netflix and a terrestrial broadcast, then you’ll be able to show your customers not only what their shiny new TV is going to be capable of when it’s turned up to the max, but how amazing it will still perform with everyday TV banality.
  4. Having said that, you should always have the best possible picture running when the TVs are ‘idle’. If the manufacturer’s showreel makes the TVs look amazing then use it! You want people to be wowed, and be stopped in their tracks, and go “Ooohh…!” and that’s what these things are designed to do.
  5. Don’t hog the remote. Let the customer play around with it and bond with the TV when you’re demonstrating its awesome features. If all goes well, they’ll be starting to think about how this TV will look and perform when they plug it in at home. They’ll be starting to want it, desire it, need it. Of course, there’s a danger that the remote will be so unwieldy that the customer might trip the factory reset procedure, so make sure you have a list of simple functions they can work through without upsetting anything.

Lastly, we’ll sign off with a suggestion that, if you don’t already do so, it’s a good idea to think beyond the TV. We all know about cross-selling a TV with brackets and cables, Blu-ray players and set top boxes etcetera, but what about a sound bar? TVs these days sound terrible, only marginally better than your mobile phone in some cases and for the same reasons – they’re thin and lightweight, so whacking giant speakers into them just wouldn’t work.

Sound bars don’t just make your movies sound better, they make everything sound better, and there are plenty of options around to suit most peoples’ needs.

Go for it.

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